Mount Saint Vincent Provides Best Value to Students according to “Money” Magazine

One of Ten New York State Institutions to Receive an A Range Ranking for “Value Added”

CMSV

Riverdale, N.Y. –– The College of Mount Saint Vincent has been recognized as one of Money magazine’s “Best Colleges,” a listing of the 4 year institutions of higher education delivering the “most value,” defined by the magazine as a great education, at an affordable price, that helps students launch promising careers.

The College received an “A-” ranking for “value added,” a rating developed by Money that reflects how well a school’s students perform compared to expectations for students with similar economic and academic backgrounds–measured by graduation rates, student loan default rates and post-graduation earnings. Mount Saint Vincent is one of just 10 institutions in New York State to receive an “A” range ranking for “value added” and sits above 37 other schools in the state whose value-added grade reflects a “B” or lower.

“We are delighted Money magazine is reporting what we have known for some time. The College offers an exceptional education. We work hard to contain costs and to offer strong merit and need based financial aid programs. The ‘value added’ by a Mount education, the ‘return on investment,’ is very, very high. As expensive as education is, Mount Saint Vincent is proud to be among the leaders of this region and the nation in making exceptional education a realistic option for all talented students,” said Charles L. Flynn, Jr., President of the College of Mount Saint Vincent. “The Mount’s A-range grade from Money magazine validates the College’s quality and cost. Parents and students know that higher education matters. They know it makes opportunity real. Like Money magazine, they worry about quality, which we offer, and they worry about affordability, to which Mount Saint Vincent is also committed.”

According to Money, the rankings determine which of the nation’s approximate 1,500 four-year colleges and universities give you the best value for your money. Less than half of the nation’s colleges met the magazine’s initial screening criteria, which required a graduation rate that was at or above the median for its institutional category (public or private)/or a graduation rate at least 25% above what would be expected given the incomes and test scores of its students, and  no signs of financial difficulty—those with speculative bond ratings from Moody’s, or those flagged as having financial problems by the U.S. Department of Education where removed. Institutions were then ranked on 21 factors in three equally weighted categories: educational quality, affordability, and alumni earnings. Money then used a statistical technique to turn its data into a single score, ranking schools based on those scores