Two Florida Schools Lead the Way for Hispanic Graduate Students

Every year, The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine publishes lists of grad-uate schools with the highest Hispanic enrollment and most degrees conferred on Hispanics. And while we analyze trends and dis-sect the numbers relating to gender, geography and percentage of Hispanics represented at groups of institutions, it is equally important to pause and point out outstanding and consistent individual performance by single schools. This year, on our lists of many exemplary schools, there are two Florida schools that stand out for special attention – Nova Southeastern University (NSU) and Florida International University (FIU).
Both finished first or second on our lists of Top 25 schools for Business/Management/Marketing M.A. and Ph.D. Degrees Combined for Hispanics as well as total Graduate School Enrollment of Hispanics. It would be easy to assume that location has everything to do with these schools’ success. Both are located where there are Hispanic-rich populations, but that is not the whole story.
FIU, for example, touts its proximity to an international business center. It has a 12-month International M.B.A. (I.M.B.A.) program cater-ing to students who want to fast track their way into the opportunities available today in interna-tional business. The setting for the school, Miami, is a large hub of international business, regional headquarters for more than 1,200 multinational corporations, trade organizations and banks, providing a practical laboratory for learning and networking. U.S. News & World Report has placed it in the top 25 of all interna-tional M.B.A. programs.
In terms of its M.B.A./Ph.D. programs, NSU promotes its student-friendly scheduling and the comprehensive nature of its business programs. The university provides its graduate classes at times and places convenient to its students. Many of its graduate programs offer classes scheduled at night and on weekends on their main campus, at Student Educational Centers throughout Florida, and online. It offers a variety of business degree programs at the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, including accounting, finance, human resource management and public administration. The Huizenga School is home to the largest M.B.A. and Master of Accounting degree programs in Florida. Its main campus is located in Fort Lauderdale, but their programs are also available at multiple locations and online.
Viewing the list of Top 25 schools for total enrollment of Hispanics, with NSU first and FIU second, California has the most schools thereon – eight. Five are part of the California State University group. Texas has five schools on that list, and Florida has four. Other states represent-ed on the enrollment list are Minnesota (two), New Mexico (two), New York (two), Arizona (one) and Missouri (one). Hispanic women outnumbered Hispanic men at all 25 schools. The University of Texas-El Paso had the largest percentage of Hispanic students at 60 percent.
In terms of engineering master’s and doctor-al degrees conferred on Hispanics, the University of Southern California edged out FIU by one student (47-46). Last year, the University of Florida ranked first, also edging out FIU by one student (53-52). Engineering is one of the few areas in which Hispanic men outnumbered Hispanic women – in all 25 schools. Texas had the most schools represented on this list, six. Other states on the list included California (five), Florida (four), New Mexico (two), Colorado (one), Georgia (one), Illinois (one), Massachusetts (one), Michigan (one), New Jersey (one), New York (one), and Washington (one). The University of Texas-El Paso had the highest percentage of Hispanic engineering conferees, 30 percent.
FIU ranked first for most master’s and doctor-al degrees conferred on Hispanics in the area of business/management/marketing for 2010 with 426. NSU ranked second with 358. In 2009, NSU topped FIU by one student, 321-320. Texas schools dominated this same list with eight schools. California and Florida each had five. Seven states had one school represented: Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico and New York. On this Top 25 list, Hispanic male degree earners outnumbered females in 14 schools, and Hispanic female degree earners out-numbered men in the remaining 11.
In the area of education, Lamar University in Texas led the pack, awarding the most master’s and doctoral degrees to Hispanics. Lamar was one of seven Texas schools on this list. California had the most schools, eight; New York had four; Arizona and Florida, two each. Illinois and Massachusetts had one each. Education gradu-ate programs continue to be dominated by females – Hispanic females outnumbered Hispanic males in all 25 schools listed.
Data are derived from various lists compiled by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and its Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). Last year, NCES established a timeline of releasing degree com-pletion data every two years instead of annually. However this year as The Hispanic Outlook went to press on this issue, the previously unre-leased 2010 degree completion data became available on the NCES-IPEDS system.
NCES also has created a new data-gathering system. Because of the new system, not all schools are on every data list. Schools have been given two years to comply with the new NCES data-gath-ering system. HO has combined all available data from all NCES lists to give fair representation to all institutions during this transition.

2009 Graduate Schools Enrolling Hispanics

2009 Graduate Schools Enrolling Hispanics

2010 Degrees Granted. First Major All Master's and Ph.D Degrees in Business/Management/Marketing

2010 Degrees Granted. First Major All Master's and Ph.D Degrees in Business/Management/Marketing

2010 Degrees Granted. First Major all Master's and Ph.D. Degrees in Engineering

2010 Degrees Granted. First Major all Master's and Ph.D. Degrees in Engineering

Firs Major all Master's and Ph.D Degrees in Education

Firs Major all Master's and Ph.D Degrees in Education